May 10/11: Must Sees

The art forecast is calling for a compelling weekend jam packed with fresh ideas and creative concepts. Be sure to check out our must sees for the weekend:

Opening this weekend:

Hamiltonian Gallery, The Salon of Little Deaths
1353 U Street, NW
Open May 11th – June 15th, 2013 (Opening reception May 11th, 7-9pm)
http://www.hamiltoniangallery.com/exhibitions/the-salon-of-little-deaths/

Matthew Mann and Milana Braslavsky revitalize the enduring genres of landscape and still life with a contemporary approach in The Salon of Little Deaths, an exhibition on view at Hamiltonian.

Matthew Mann investigates narrative and the pictorial vocabulary of painting through disjointed landscapes, dead birds and eruptions of foliage on fields of luminous color. The result is a collection of cryptic works that speak at once to art history and visual perception in the digital age.

Milana Braslavsky‘s seductive photographic still lifes of fruit on tabletops are replete with quiet violence, sexual tension and a wry sensibility. Contrasting the delicacy of ripe fruit with crisply folded linens and household objects, Braslavsky’s sumptuous photographs function both as still lifes and evocative portraits of unseen personages while communicating themes of desire, loss and decay.

On view now:

Heiner Contemporary, STASH
1675 Wisconsin Ave, NW
Open April 26th – June 8th, 2013
http://heinercontemporary.com/exhibitions/stash-2013

Heiner Contemporary is pleased to announce STASH, an exhibition pulled from the gallery's flat files and storage, featuring work by Polly Apfelbaum, Ingrid Calame, Tara Donovan, Deborah Kass, Kate Shepherd, Jon-Phillip Sheridan and Austin Thomas. STASH diverges from typical programming by presenting artwork that is usually viewed by appointment only. From Polly Apfelbaum's bright floral woodblock prints to Tara Donovan's intricate relief print from a pin matrix and Austin Thomas's intimate journal pages, STASH features an array of artistic practices and pursuits. Together, the works reflect the gallery's aesthetic interests and demonstrate an over-arching concern for color and pattern.  (Cover photo courtesy of Heiner Contemporary, Ingrid Calame)

The Fridge, …with love and care
516 ½ 8th St, SE
Open May 4th – 26th, 2013
http://www.thefridgedc.com/portfolio/withloveandcare/

with love and care is an international group show curated by DC-based artist Astrotwitch. The show features seven artists from places as far as Sao Paulo and Berlin known for creating hand-painted posters to put up on the street.

In an era when it’s simple to print hundreds of copies of a poster, these artists continue a slow production process that creates one-of-a-kind public art that will decay with time, or, more typically, will live on the street for a few weeks before it is stolen or buffed out.

The show will feature original posters, photography of the artists’ work found on the street and a poster mural on the façade of The Fridge.

Participating artists include N.O Bonzo and Circle Face (Portland, OR); MAR! (Los Angeles, CA); Galo (Sao Paulo, Brazil); Alaniz (Berlin, Germany); and DECOY and Astrotwitch (Washington, DC).

Last chance:

The Phillips Collection, Angels, Demons, and Savages: Jackson Pollock, Alfonso Ossorio and Jean Dubuffet
1600 21st Street, NW
CLOSING May 12th. 2013

The Phillips Collection dives into American abstract expressionism to reveal a little-known but captivating story that focuses on the relationship among three of the movement’s seminal players: American painter Jackson Pollock (1912–1956), American artist and patron Alfonso Ossorio (1916–1990), and French painter Jean Dubuffet (1901–1985). Featuring 55 paintings and works on paper from 1945 to 1958, the exhibition illuminates a key moment in postwar art. It reunites a number of works by Pollock and Dubuffet from Ossorio’s collection for the first time since they were dispersed after his death in 1990.

Angels, Demons, and Savages highlights visual affinities between the artists’ work, tracing the impact of Dubuffet’s art brut (art by the mentally ill and other so-called outsiders), the experimental spirit of Pollock’s technique, and Ossorio’s figurative language. As the focal point of the art world shifted from Europe to America, the exchange among the three helped bridge the widening gap between the continents.

Bringing the Art in DC to You, 

Cara